Tuesday, September 5, 2017

THAT IS UTTER BS.



ODT  a week ago headlined "more children die from damp cold houses than car crashes", oh and drownings if the car crash thingy is beyond comprehension.

Today I am in moving on from my old childhood home after a one night stopover while touring in areas with limited interwebby coverage.

Damaged in the Waiau (too many have it as the Kaikoura) earthquake, all four chimneys now gone one through the roof and lots of cracking of the lath and plaster linings but the old girl has come through well for an over a century old homestead.
One thing that is noticeable is the warmth from a Logfire and HRV ventilation that survived unscathed

How the hell did we survive in the mid 20th century.
Sole heating, a coal  range in the kitchen and an open fire in the dining room on somewhat rare occasions.
Of course in the absence of global warming from fossil fuels consumption, it was so much colder in the fifties yet sleeping on an open veranda, travelling two miles to a schoolbus on a bike by 8am, drinking unpasteurised milk, eating uninspected home kill meat, no electric, occasionally a warm hotwater bottle to aid getting to sleep. No asthma, bronchitis, or pneumonia that is hospitalising thousands today according to the ODT fake news.

Cold damp homes my posteria, crap parenting, no understanding of fresh air, and good housekeeping.

23 comments:

Anonymous said...

In spite of your heroic efforts in keeping bronchitis at bay you may be aware that the economics of running an old house in the suburbs has changed in the last 50 years.

You mentioned that your old house had four chimneys. The large masonry mass spread around the house would act as a heat sink and after two weeks of fires would maintain an even temperature around the house...not as good as masonry walls and floor but better than a one chimney house. Given that there are smokeless zones in cities and the price of fuel mainly bottled gas, which causes condensation, it is no wonder that the houses of my childhood are far worse now. Unvented washing machines and even dishwashers and the loss of open fires which ventilated the house are the main culprits.
http://www.hendersoninternational.co.nz/common-problems-with-new-zealand-houses/

Lord Egbut

paul scott said...

I burn good dry blue gum in a 1920's brick house, quite small. I get up at night to try to hold the fire in but we lose a lot of heat. I think through the ceiling , where the old pink batts are a bit spread out. I would like to ventilate the fire warmth to the bedroom, air seems to be such a lousy conductor
I heard the gaps in the system and those downlights give good heat escape.
The curtains I put in help quite a bit. The heat pump in the open plan kitchen well doesn't do much. Nobody has died there though, I couldn't even freeze out the Thai girl living there, had to use a more direct approach.

Anonymous said...

Blue gum by gum.... How's Reg Paul...remember him?

Lord Egbut Nobacon

Noel said...

Asthma is triggered by damp not caused. Research suggests 1 in 4 children suffer today.Why its more prevalent is debatable but most research noe discounts poor housekeeping practices.
Im surprised there isnt more research on the value between roof insulation of older homes with or without positive air displacement systems.
Son brought an old do up. Was a wait for the roof installation installer so I shouted him a Smart Vent system which was close to the same price. Didn't see any change in dampness once the insulation was in place although the house was warmer.

Gerald said...

https://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/read-the-journal/all-issues/2010-2019/2013/vol-126-no-1387/5950

Noel said...

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10893343

Interesting that they found it was the dampness and not the concentrations of dust mites, which has been the foundation for the lack of house keeping argument.

Also make one wonder if the current millions spent could be better supported by discounts on positive air displacement systems in addition to the current insulation alone.

paul scott said...

I knew two Reg's. One an inlander, I met him in alcohol school, I mean no alcohol school, and Reg a small animal Vet who worked in my practice. Normally one avoids people called Reginald, it sounds as though their parents may have been progressives. Tom, Frank and Bill safer.

Anonymous said...

I hope Dodger will in future do a modicum of research before posting about a serious problem that New Zealand faces. For too long cheap and shoddy house building has been allowed without any oversight or thought of future consequences.

Most of these problems were aired during the "leaky buildings" saga a few years ago but little was done but as usual free enterprise takes the money and the social pays for the consequences. Our infant mortality and children in poverty figures are shameful not to mention our education system in disarray.



Lord Egbut Nobacon

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

"Our infant mortality and children in poverty figures are shameful not to mention our education system in "

How long have you been living in France?

Anonymous said...

Troll Adolf DLT....Why don't you read the links that Gerald was kind enough to post instead of shooting from the lip.

"A report entitled ‘Doing Better for Children’ published in 2009, revealed that New Zealand is ranked 29th out of 30 countries in the OECD for overall child health and safety.1 This report identified that New Zealand was ranked 21st for infant mortality, 20th for the proportion of children living in poor houses and had rates of whooping cough and pneumonia 5–10 times greater than the United Kingdom and United States."

Lord Egbut

Paranormal said...

And you believe that report Egbut? How much of NZs poor child outcomes was really ONLY due to allegedly poor quality housing?

As for the quality of our housing, care to stop for a moment and consider how it is possible we could have poor housing when building materials have always needed government approval, plans need to be submitted and approved by council, and regular building inspections are required?

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

Poor Legbut. Too dumb to recognise irony.

S L O W L Y - just for Legbut

He babbles on about 'our infant mortality figures' when he lives in France.

Gerald said...

Where are you Adolf?
SA or WA?

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

None of your business Gerald and totally irrelevant.

Anonymous said...

My childhood was spent living in Waiouru [army housing]. Sole heating was a kitchen chip heater, supplemented by a kerosene wick heater. The winter winds from the Rangipo found every gap in the cladding. Army wives were driven to distraction trying to keep the home warm and get washing dry. I wound up in Taihape hospital with double pneumonia, but escaping to play in the snow [in my socks]down by the Desert Road may have had some bearing on that.
We live in a temperate to cold climate, but we build for a sub-tropical one. Its poor economics as it bites back with health issues down the line or the high utility bills that must be paid to just survive. The more that can be prevented at design and build stage the better.

Mick

Gerald said...

So it's totally irrevent where Lord Egbut is?

David said...

As for the quality of our housing, care to stop for a moment and consider how it is possible we could have poor housing when building materials have always needed government approval, plans need to be submitted and approved by council, and regular building inspections are required?

Yes, all that AND leaky buildings!

David said...

Gerald, neither are in NZ. One claims to have been in its military, the other just makes claims. :-)

The Veteran said...

Mick ... so 'Pleurisy Point' in Waiouru resonates well with you then. Wives certainly deserved a medal. Army housing ... no carpeting and if you went to the expense of installing it your took the chance that when you left the incoming tenant might agree to purchase it off you. It was bog standard 'State' housing designed by people who had no experience of Waiouru winters. Ventilation was poor to non existent and the build up of condensation had to be seen to be believed ... gueez, one Christmas and it actually snowed ... but, in the immortal words of Lcpl Jones, they were good times.

Anonymous said...

Lcpl Jones might have got a rude retort from a contingent of FMF soldiers who I saw detrained at Waiouru station into the slush. Formed up by some blockhead with stripes shouting at them until they got it right -- catatonic with cold, splendid in red tunics, white sulus and sandals. The poor swine must have thought they were heading for the gulag. Only the Army...
Mick

Noel said...

Militaries don't have a good history of allowing for aclimatisation.
From Tropic Lightening units suffering hypothermia at Waiouru to Tasmanian based soldiers suffering heat stroke not long after exiting aircraft at Darwin.

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

Quite so Noel but I recall my grandfather who landed on Galipolli, sending back pictures of himself astride a camel in Egypt while 'aclimatising.'

David said...

Yes, Adolf, those camels were really useful at Galipolli. :-) A bit like your buddy President Pussy Grabber wanting to win a war in Korea with tanks!