Tuesday, January 14, 2020

TWO SIDES TO EVERY STORY

I see that one of our regular contributors, Max Richie, has been pilloried in the media for time spent on the course course during the period he was Executive Director of the Neurological Foundation.  

I don't have any skin in this game and have only a passing acquaintance with Max as a colleague army officer (never served with him) but the flip side of the story, glossed over both by the Charities Commission and media, is that during his time as ED the Foundation increased its funding for research from $350.000 to $3m.

Would have thought that if this came about from Max's networking on the golf course this was a pretty good outcome ... seems to me there's some office politics in play here.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

On the other had it could be the talented hardworking boys and girls left behind covering his entitled ass.

Anonymous said...

But he did concede the 3million was a team effort suggesting it wasn't all arranged on the greens.
Anyway he resigned before the investigation started.

gravedodger said...

How many of Richie's critics are people who don't concede the part time Prime Minister is failing as leader of the country and probably have no idea just how smart Trump is when results are calculated?
I have skin in the game here and Neurological research funding could be very beneficial if funded to ten percent of what we send to "Paris" annually to fund the climate cult?

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

What investigation? A bit of snooping for a malicious hit story by the execrable Herald?

ROFL said...

Wrong Adolf.
Charities Services oversight for registered charities.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/118726453/former-charity-boss-spent-271-paid-working-days-on-the-golf-course-over-four-years

Max Ritchie said...

Anonymous (for good reason): Actually I retired after the investigation was completed. The time off was accrued leave after 20 plus years at the Foundation. But you wouldn't want to let facts interfere with your view of the world, would you?

Max Ritchie said...

Veteran: yes, a lot more to this than the paper reported. But by and large the Herald report is factual, just incomplete. At the Foundation's request, from 1997 I took part of my pay, eventually 30%, in time off, to keep the wages budget down. For many years I was the publications, projects and fundraising staff. The talented, hardworking boys and girls (actually almost exclusive girls) Anonymous refers to came later. Even with the time off I still spent an awful lot of time at my desk or on the road, with the research budget going from $350,00 when I started in 1994 to $3 million when I retired in 2017. The Chair of Clinical Neurology, the Chair of Neurosurgery and the development of the Human Brain Bank all benefited in addition.

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

I make that seventy-eight days of unpaid leave each year.

I wonder if we will see an apology from The Herald or from David Farrar or from the Charities Commission?

gravedodger said...

We wont hold our breath Adolf.
Thanks for your work Max Ritchie.
My love of almost sixty years endures her battle with Parkinsons including an eighteen month research commitment to BRI (Brain research Institute) and one thing we learnt is the gross underfunding of the arena.
Parkinsons, Multiple Sclerosis, Motor Neurone, and even Strokes and Brain Hemorrhage all need funding into causes, treatments and support but not being fashionable tend to miss out.
A brain injury from an often entirely avoidable 'accident' situation attracts greater profile.
Seven years on the journey and we discover bigger gaps and "poor relation" efforts in the area of all neurological disease treatment and research.