Thursday, October 20, 2016

The News - In Black And White

Three Aboriginals died in Walgett after drinking moonshine whisky containing high levels of methanol. (Only one of six news reports mentioned the dead were Aboriginals.)

Walgett?  I hear you ask.  Where the hell is Walgett?  Not very far from Bourke where you don't want to at the back of.

Who lives at Wallgett?   Not many white fellas.

It is ironic that Australian children who live in cities and have never been anywhere near an outback settlement are being taught all about aboriginal culture by teachers who have never been off a bitumen road.  Of course the prevalent culture of alcohol abuse, child abuse and woman abuse is rarely mentioned.

Little, if anything, is taught about the country's history of the last one hundred years.  How do I know?  Every day I meet youngsters from age ten to eighteen and I ask them.  A typical response is "We have lots of aboriginal studies and there's no time for anything else."

In the suburb of Elizabeth there can be found streets named Midway, Yorktown, Halsey, Blamey, Spruance, Fletcher, Kincaid, Enterprise, Saratoga, Nimitz and Hornet.

None of the kids I talk to have the faintest idea of who or what these names represent or of why they are there.

Sad, isn't it?   Their heads are crammed full of aboriginal studies.

9 comments:

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

The greatest surprise to me was the complete lack of knowledge concerning Field Marshall Thomas Blamey who, among other things, commanded the Australian troops in the battle of Kokoda.

Alistair said...

"In the suburb of Elizabeth there can be found streets named Midway, Yorktown, Halsey, Blamey, Spruance, Fletcher, Kincaid, Enterprise, Saratoga, Nimitz and Hornet.

None of the kids I talk to have the faintest idea of who or what these names represent or of why they are there."


These street names are temporary - the pc folk will see to it.

Anonymous said...

The complete lack of knowledge about Australia abandoning the POW's at Sandakan doesn't surprise me because we try to hide our most shameful moments.

3:16

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

Not quite sure what you imagine Australia could have done, 3:16.

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Adolf Fiinkensein said...

Another dopey troll.

David said...

Adolf, once again, I must further your education.

There was no single battle of Kokoda. There were numerous battles along the Kokoda Track as one side, then the other, either advanced or retreated.

Thanks Mr Mac, my Grade 6 teacher at Albion Primary School and a returned soldier from that campaign. When we were getting sick of the rote learning that was used in that era, we could always get Mr Mac to tell us a tale or two of the living conditions, the relationship with the "fuzzie Wuzzies". But, again common to men of that experience, he never spoke much about what actually happened, which left his legacy less understood and a generation growing up thinking that war was a great game, until the realities of Vietnam (and televised coverage) showed the human cost of war.



Adolf Fiinkensein said...

David

Dancing on a pinhead again? Most battles go forward and backward for a bit before one side wins.

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

Great to see David your inestimable knowledge of happenings at Kokoda comes entirely from a man who " never spoke much about what actually happened,...."