Tuesday, July 14, 2015

How Strange!!!!!!!

The ABC is reporting the discovery of a so-called 'cache' of weapons found in an old unoccupied house in Sydney's southern parts.  The article does not indicate whether any supplies of ammunition were found.

'Nazi' designed MP40 machine gun

sniper rifle

There is some blurb about how these weapons were 'ready for use anytime' but have a look at the pictures and ask yourself whether you see anything strange?

As soon as I saw the sniper rifle I recognized my old friend the Lee Enfield No 4.  This one obviously has been rebarreled to take .222 rather than .303 ammunition.  All three weapons appear to be WW11 vintage - the No 4 was introduced in 1941.

My guess is they were brought back by returning servicemen after the war and have been hidden away ever since.  No self respecting terrorist would use this equipment when much better weapons are readily available.

16 comments:

Noel said...

Scope looks much younger than 1946?

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

You may well be right.

Noel said...

I'm sure it is which means your guess is totally wrong.

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

Don't be too sure.

http://www.jaegerplatoon.net/scope_M3943.jpg

Psycho Milt said...

"Nazi-designed?" These arseholes really are desperate for drama. That MP40 looks like it's been kept in good nick, but who'd want to rely on using modern ammunition in it for combat? You'd be wondering how many rounds you were going to get off before it jammed.

Noel said...

Remain sure. Lyman or Lithgow but not that.

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

Milt

What's the difference between ammunition produced in 1944 an that produced today? Please explain.

Psycho Milt said...

No expertise to contribute, just thinking that the fact the cartridges fit doesn't mean the firing properties are the same. More kick, less kick, either way reliability's going to be an issue.

Noel said...

Gee here I'm splitting technicals on scopes when after rereading the article the evidence that your guess is bovine is the bags they were in. LOL.

Paranormal said...

I doubt it's been re-barreled and suspect the paper just got the calibre wrong. The magazine doesn't look like it's been modified for the smaller round and the barrel (what little you can see), bolthead and all the woodwork also look original.

Paranormal said...

PM I can assure you MP40's have no problems digesting modern ammo.

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

Paranormal

Yes that's what it looks like. You are most observant. I can find no historical reference to a .222 Lee Enfield No 4 sniper rifle.

Noel said...

Most common change was to 7.62 in 1950s.
I suspect its a misprint of 2.222 which is the chamber size for 303 stamped on the weapon.



Psycho Milt said...

Paranormal: thanks, that's interesting. I had expected there'd be significant differences.

Regardless, Adolf's assessment that we're looking at some returned serviceman's war booty is a lot more plausible than it being Al Qaeda's local armoury.

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

You've got it, Milt.

I recall in the early seventies reading of a Fokker F 27 airliner traveling from Sydney to Darwin which was buzzed by a spitfire over central Australia. Apparently an RAAF pilot who ran a very large sheep and cattle station just 'brought one home.'

JC said...

Back in the mid 60s I owned a .303 that was rechambered to a .270.. made a hell of a din.

The .222 and .223 were just starting to be the preferred rifle of the Dept of Protection Forestry (NZFS was the parent) in the mid 60s and I doubt anyone would be bothered with a .222 adaption on such an old stock as the .303.

Really, the only modification to the .303 which had much success was cutting the wood off the barrel to make it more of a sports rifle.

Round a fire or in a pub the older deer cullers still liked the the full wood .303 but there was a surprising (to me) sentiment for the older Winchesters in bush shooting.

JC