Friday, July 25, 2014

Compulsory Maori Language.



Debate has emerged from secondary principals concern at numeracy and literacy among year nine children arriving at their levels with insufficient skills to fully engage the work and some needing remedial learning.
Random observations from specialist subject educators echo what the secondary principals are saying at entry levels for Tertiary study, notably engineering and the law.

Contemporaneously we have election year calls to expand the now widely taught rudimentary te reo skills at primary levels.

How to merge those two claims when the second would seem to likely constrain the former.

At present it is claimed children can "count" to ten in te reo  Tahi.  Rua.  Toru. Whā.  Rima. Ono. Whitu.  Waru.  Iwa.  Tekau,  yet it would be reasonable to believe that skill is completely bereft of comprehension as to what that string of te reo, too often actually means in mathematics.

So it would appear that those calling for compulsory te reo will need to establish significant quantitative measures as to how far they wish to push that desire .

The measurable barriers to learning at year nine in english and maths skill levels seem to indicate sufficient problems already apparent with the curriculum load in place.

My maternal grandmother came from Scotland with very little English but fluent in Gaelic and I have always had nostalgic urges to have been afforded opportunity to learn rudimentary skill in that treasure so I have a fleeting regard as to what te reo speakers are wishing to preserve but pragmatism has me seeing it was something that had to come by way of family and input outside basic education construct not crowded into an already struggling and over loaded curriculum.

I recall a discussion during a golf round  many many moons ago in a four  that included a primary principal and curriculum expansion arose as the topic.
Ken's immediate and quite vehement contribution was something that had never occurred to me until then but is now more relevant than ever.
"Our masters and rulers are for ever adding to the curriculum but they never address in any way, a review, of what exists to create space for  additions, we just have to make it happen" and that was 40 years ago.

How about instead of the politically attractive to some, broad brush wish, how about some what, when, and how much. I for one consider there may be quite enough already under a voluntary regime responding to the wishes of local parents for their children.

8 comments:

pdm said...

GD - my father came to NZ from the Isle Of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides where all of the locals, even now, are still fluent in Gaelic. We have visited there 3 times - the first in 1977,

On that visit my fathers brother and his wife were still alive and Gaelic was the language spoken in their home, obviously with English as a concession to our presence.

On our most recent visit in 2011 my cousins and there families still conversed among themselves in Gaelic and we regularly heard it spoken on the streets of Stornoway. Gaelic is not a dying language but I don't know if it is taught in the schools or if it is left to parents.

Edward the Confessor said...

"it would be reasonable to believe that skill is completely bereft of comprehension as to what that string of te reo, too often actually means in mathematics."

Why would it be reasonable to believe that random, evidence-free assertion?

Edward the Confessor said...

"it would be reasonable to believe that skill is completely bereft of comprehension as to what that string of te reo, too often actually means in mathematics."

Why would it be reasonable to believe that random, evidence-free assertion?

gravedodger said...

Hello Backward, been having lunch with old mates in Qtown or what? Figures took a bit of a hit while you have been away but a tad pathetic to try to make it up by repeating yourself.
Caught up with good old Pete Georges blog lately? did you take the pic yourself?

Edward the Confessor said...

You don't have much besides inane abuse do you, guy? Here's a tip; try addressing the actual question.

thor42 said...

If Maori want their language to survive (and it *is* their language, not mine) then they should put the effort in *themselves*.

( Yeah, I know - fat chance. )

Don't force the useless language onto everyone else.

The Realist said...

Well I feel sad that they have tried to modernise the language by making up stupid half-caste words. The language will never be appropriate in the modern world. I would very much prefer that the language were kept pure like Church Latin. I would be a definite starter to learn a pure language like that. I have no interest in learning modern Maori.

The Veteran said...

Gidday Realist .... don't really do 'Church' Latin. Pig Latin more like it. You know, virtus et honoris and all of that.

I have this wonderful picture of you in a cassock sans beard.