Saturday, June 28, 2014

Saying It Does Not make It So.


One of the first offers for votes from Laila Harre is "free tertiary education for all" in the first of a list of unfinished business Herr Schmit's Poodle brings to the election campaign.

Basic economics Ms Harre, it will never be free so why didn't you say all tertiary fees to be subsidised, because that is what it will be.

Harre, Sykes, Minto, Corkery, each and every one from the Alliance 1990 until The Troughmaster General gathered up his toys and his safe Wigram seat and went back to his protege  Helen Elizabeth Clark for the next ego trip in the  long list that created the legend in his own mind.

Sadly many of those who will be enticed by The Old Grey mare's bribe will be in complete ignorance of the destructive and counter productive outcomes from the distortions created.
Another bunch of dreamers with diplomas in bone carving, maypole dancing, salsa and whatever a smart course planner can devise to attract funding but  with zero associated employment opportunities for graduates.

So the seats on the 90 day roller coaster ride start to fill.

They are not "Free" someone else is paying and it will not be a fat German benefactor waiting for US Marshals to call at Coatsville.

2 comments:

Edward the Confessor said...

The "Old Grey mare" (sic)?

Weren't you whining about ageism recently, old fella?

"fat German"

Xenophobia and sizeism aside, he's a Kiwi now, thanks to Jonathan Coleman.

Psycho Milt said...

They are not "Free" someone else is paying...

If you one day actually find someone who doesn't realise "free" public services are paid for via taxation, do feel free to educate them. But I've never met one yet.

Another bunch of dreamers with diplomas in bone carving, maypole dancing, salsa and whatever a smart course planner can devise to attract funding...

Kind of funny you should mention that, as it was a result not of governments providing "free" tertiary education, but of the Bolger/Shipley Nat government ending "free" tertiary ed and replacing it with a "bums on seats" funding model that financially rewarded institutions for increasing their rolls, regardless of how they achieved the increase. It led not only to institutions offering the kinds of courses you mention, but also to polytechs and universities competing in each others' markets, to the severe detriment of NZ tertiary ed. These days, the tertiary ed sector looks on Nat governments mainly as a trial to be endured and a source of stupid ideas to be countered to the extent possible. It's open to question whether the sector would look on an Internet/Mana government as being in any sense a worse prospect than a National one.