Sunday, September 23, 2012

LIMITED SERVICE VOLUNTEER SCHEME

I had occasion recently to discuss the worth of the Limited Service Volunteer scheme with a serving officer who was closely involved with the programme.
For those who are not up with the play, the scheme revolves around a six week residential course run by the military for young persons aged between 18 and 25 who have been on a benefit for six months or more.   It teaches basic life skills in a controlled environment.    Since 2008 the Government has beefed up the scheme with an additional 7,000 places on offer in the belief that it helps young people turn their lives around.
 
I had, quite frankly, expected a low level of enthusiasm for the scheme from the officer I spoke to ... after-all, it is a couple of steps removed from what he signed up for and might have been considered a dead-end type posting.
 
I was wrong.   He said it was a posting he looked back on with pride and was one of the most enjoyable he had .... watching young adults with low levels of esteem grow and mature and start believing in themselves to the point that when they graduated they had something positive to offer prospective employers.    
 
Having experienced a taste of service life some end up seeking to make a career in the military and that is well and good but my understanding is that a significant number of graduates move into general paid employment within six months.   That being the case it is money well spent.
 
Employers should be encouraged by the success of the scheme.   I note too  there is an incentive for employing such people under the Government's Job Streams programme.
 
 

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Job Stream...is that the one that cost the taxpayer 62 million?

Noel said...

"Sixty-two percent of those who go through this course do not go back on to benefit."

Anyone know the ratio of those who get jobs immediately after completing the report to those who continue on to further training?

Noel said...

Sorry should read course not report.

The Veteran said...

Anon 1:52 ... assuming your figures are correct it's a hell of a lot better than having them remain on the unemployment benefit and becoming further alienated from society.

I can only assume, from the tone of your post, that is your preference ... sorry, not mine.

Anonymous said...

There are 5 Intakes per year.
Say around 500 of which about 40 percent return to the benefit.
Say around 300 left of which a "substantial number", according to The Veteran, are in employment after six months. Perhaps 200 employed and 100 in further State funded training.

Noel said...

Thanks Anonymous 8.42 am

The Veteran said...

Anon 8.42 .... even accepting your figures (which I don't) 40% in long term paid employment is a good outcome. But be my guest in your choosing to drink from a glass half empty rather than half full.

It sure is easy to be negative but a more intelligent assessment is that the LAV scheme is a continuing success story.

Anonymous said...

Clearly the sceptics have not met anyone who has been on LSV. I have and the change is dramatic. Graduates come out with a real purpose in life. It starts with getting out of the bed in the morning- this may seem trivial but a good start. I gather that at the end of the LSV it is an emotional time where candidates realise what they have achieved.
The issue is finding a job afterwards.
Richard

Anonymous said...

The Veteran said
"even accepting your figures (which I don't)"

That implies you have more accurate information.

Put it up.

Anonymous said...

The Veteran said
"...is that the LAV scheme is a continuing success story."

Most recent announcement is the LAV's are been left behind for the Afghans.

Anonymous said...

The Veterans said
"But be my guest in your choosing to drink from a glass half empty rather than half full."

Interestinly over the years there have been some good structured studies on who is closer to reality.
Optimists or Pessimists?
The answer was neither.
In fact when another cohort, those with depressive illness was added they were found to be closest.

Watching Brief said...

Hello to all
We actually do have a program, which struggles for support (maybe becuase it is the ambulance at the top of the cliff (as opposed to the botomn)called the NZ Cadet FOrce
As a Unit Commander I have seen a large number of thirteen year olds join and leave at eighteen with a sense of pride in our County's Armed Services as well as an individual sense of self esteem.
We need (and the contributor is an arch capitalist) to invest more funds in structured youth development such as the NZ cadet forces