Friday, April 27, 2012

An Early Public Private Partnership

Adolf went to primary school at Orauta Maori School in Northland, back when it was a functioning and highly successful school with three full time teachers and a roll exceeding one hundred.











I wonder how many Labour, Greens, Mana et al activists realise this school came to be as the result of a sophisticated Public Private Partnership?

Among its many achievements in the sixties was the highest pass rate for Maori pupils from ANY primary school in NZ for School Certificate and University Entrance; the highest entre into the professions for Maori pupils from ANY school in NZ; a choir of considerable reputation and the highest illegitimate birth rate among teens for Maori pupils from ANY school in NZ.

I have no accurate record of when the school was founded but I think it may have been in 1935 or 1936. Twenty five years later, a jubilee celebration there was addressed by the late Sir James Henare who gave an account of its genesis.

The local Maori people, many of whom spoke little or no English,  recognised the need for their children to cope and prosper in the new Pakeha world so they banded together and did a deal with the government of the day.  They offered to provide land for a school if, in return,  the Government would build a school for their kids and provide good quality teaching staff and , most importantly, a curriculum designed specifically to equip Maori children from non English speaking homes to do well in 'main stream' secondary school - then Kawakawa District High School.  .  Thus was the school born.

It is staggering that modern day socialists are so stupid they oppose such an arrangement.

The quality of education was excellent, delivered by teachers such as Molly Leyland, Miss Wowatai, Tam Lambert, Hotu Kuru, Perie Cherrington, Bruce Pattie, Whare and Maude Isaacs - to name a few.

Sadly, sometime after Adolf moved on to secondary school, the do-gooders came along and declared that it was a crime to have separate curricula and so the school was forced to adopt the 'one for all' general curriculum.  From then on, it was all downhill and a few years ago the school closed amid acrimony and bullshit from various venal individuals wanting to grab the land.

Never forget though, for many decades little Orauta Maori School was a shining example of  a mighty successful Public Private Partnership - created by intelligent and astute Maori leaders of the day.




2 comments:

Anonymous said...

"The local Maori people, many of whom spoke little or no English, recognised the need for their children to cope and prosper in the new Pakeha world so they banded together and did a deal with the government of the day." No, it didn't really happen like that, and it wasn't all that sophisticated. It was my great-great-grandmothers land which she leased -for free- to the government. Her son-in-law was a teacher. He got a job and a place to live, and all her grandchildren/nieces/nephews got a school.

Adolf Fiinkensein said...

Anon @ 9.53

According to the late Sir James henare, who spoke at the school's twentyfifth jubilee, the way it happened is broadly as I described. You have provided a little detail and my thanks go to you for that.

I'm interested to hear you say the land belonged to your great great grandmother. Did she have Pakeha title?