Thursday, September 18, 2008

Ah, justice

Wind farm opponents face millions in costs.

Good. Maybe it will go some way to discouraging NIMBYs from vexatious litigation against sustainable energy production.

Unlikely though - the NIMBYs are already talking appeal. Hopefully that will increase the costs award when their delaying tactics run out of room.

4 comments:

OECD rank 22 kiwi said...

I agree that NIMBYs like those bleating fools around Eden Park always complaining about redevelopment are bad.

Sad part about this story is it might encourage the further "development" of ugly wind farms.

Get a coal fired power station up ya!!

JC said...

I saw case study in the US (Spotted Owl country) where a huge new sawmill application was approved by the authorities in two weeks and the application cost NZ$900!

For that state it was written into law that decisions had to be made in 10 working days, protesters had to pay a massive bond before their views could be heard and if they lost the case they had to pay for the expected loss of production for every day they delayed the consent.

Thing is, before you lodge an application for such a project you pick up a book outlining every condition expected to be met and you work through all these before you submit your application. In other words, the state removes all the uncertainties about the process before you start and requires you to take account of the problems in the planning stage.. none of this endless procession of new objections by protest groups here to sabotage the process.

JC

Ackers said...

This is also justice....

http://www.twincities.com/ci_10472581?source=most_viewed

Anonymous said...

If only that read "Nuclear Reactor opponents face millions in costs."


For that state it was written into law that decisions had to be made in 10 working days, protesters had to pay a massive bond before their views could be heard and if they lost the case they had to pay for the expected loss of production for every day they delayed the consent.


So that is excellent. That's almost how government should work - assuming you should have to make applications to build anything on your own property.


before you lodge an application for such a project you pick up a book outlining every condition expected to be met and you work through all these before you submit your application

Oh - but this bit is just even more pathetic. I figured the application form would be one page.